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As Lou Dobbs finishes his opening remarks, Jeffress laughs and nods. Across the country, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are missing paychecks, worrying about mortgages, car payments, utility bills. Some have started going to food banks. Jeffress, speaking from a remote studio in downtown Dallas, agrees completely. His own religious show airs six days a week on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. Dobbs invites Jeffress onto his show nearly every week.

Jeffress continues. He cites the Old Testament tale of Nehemiah, who was inspired by God to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. The pastor keeps going. The year-old Jeffress is trim and winsome, with a natural smile and a syrupy demeanor. As he speaks, the screen behind him shows generic patriotic imagery.

He has the syntax and enunciation of a champion debater and the certitude of someone who believes he gets his instructions directly from God. His animated ranting earns a belly laugh from Dobbs. After wiping away his TV makeup, Jeffress will walk out of the studio, drive to his home in North Dallas, and spend the rest of the evening watching TV with his wife, Amy.

TV reaches people, and reaching people is important to Jeffress. And to reach people, he knows, you must understand who they are and how they will hear you. You must be, as the Apostle Paul once put it, all things to all people. His family lives in Richardson, but they spend plenty of time at First Baptist, downtown.

First Baptist has always been enmeshed in politics: George Truett, who became pastor ingave his most famous sermon, about the separation of church and state, on the steps of the U. Capitol, in Washington, D. His successor, W. In Criswell reverses his position on desegregation and is soon thereafter voted in as president of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The move puts North Texas at the center of a massive conservative movement. Young Robert absorbs all this. His parents campaign for Barry Goldwater in When he is fourteen, Roe v. Although Jeffress is just a boy, people around him are already taking notice of his power to influence others. He rarely mentions abortion or homosexuality. Jeffress announces that he will not allow the books to be returned. The city council takes his side, the American Civil Liberties Union sues the city, and the story makes national headlines. Church attendance goes up, and soon comes an expensive new sanctuary.

Jeffress will remember these lessons when he is invited, into return to First Baptist Dallas as senior pastor. In his first few years back, he gives sermons with attention-grabbing titles Mexico tx girls fucking guys on camera the marquee and makes controversial statements about, in no particular order, Mormons, Muslims, Jews, Catholics, gays, lesbians, and Oprah Winfrey.

Almost a decade later, he embraces one of the most controversial presidential candidates of all time, and in the church reports the highest giving levels in its year history. Through all this, he retains his affinity for television. At First Baptist, the main sanctuary gets outfitted with six or seven high-definition screens that can be made into a long LED scroll that ribbons across the back of the proscenium. Sunday services are broadcast live on the church website, an operation that includes seven cameras, a team of grips and technicians, and a control room that rivals studios at CNN and Fox.

The church posts his cable news clips on YouTube. And television, it turns out, is how he connects to the president, a man with his own affinity for reality shows. The pastor interrupts himself to clarify. Look at how quickly that mouth moves. I would never want to see that used against me someday! The candidate sends nice notes or has his assistantand in earlyTrump invites Jeffress to him on the campaign trail.

The pastor spends a weekend with Trump in Iowa, where, both men understand, evangelical support can make or break a Republican presidential run. Then Jeffress is at Trump Tower on the day of the election. The mood is not optimistic. Trump asks him if he thinks evangelical voters will show up for him. The pastor says he does. Later that night, Jeffress and his wife go to the Hilton to watch the come in.

But as the evening wears on, the feeling in the room starts to change. It was a chill-bumps moment. After a speech, Mexico tx girls fucking guys on camera comes down from the stage to shake a few hands. Spotting Jeffress, he walks over and puts his arm around the pastor. The boy who used to play his accordion on Mr.

Peppermint is now standing next to the future president. We have a bit of history. In latearound the time Jeffress was first upsetting conservatives by criticizing Republican presidential front-runner Mitt Romney, I wrote a profile of Jeffress for D Magazine. In the story, I explained that despite the fact that I disagreed with him on virtually every issue—at the time, he was supporting a presidential run by Texas governor Rick Perry—I found Jeffress charming and personable.

Yes, he Mexico tx girls fucking guys on camera that the vast majority of humanity will spend eternity in a pit of fire. I was curious about his political advocacy and how he squares it with the teachings of Jesus. After the story ran, we continued to have lunch every couple of months, usually in his office. We ask each other about family and work. Same rapid-fire delivery. Same polite, saccharine manner. Same unapologetic born-again Baptist view of the world. He says he genuinely wants me to dedicate myself to Jesus Christ, and he prays for me and my wife. His goal is to save as many souls as possible before the end times.

He knows journalism is important to me, and he reminds me that some of the greatest writers in history were Christians. Jeffress often tells his flock that God sends us tests and trials. We discuss my writing something about him and his friendship with the president. He likes the idea. So for months, I attend Sunday services, hang out at church events, spend hours talking politics with religious conservatives, and meet over and over with Jeffress himself. Fresh-faced presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg, a gay military veteran and a Christian, likes to say that support for Trump is in tension with much of the New Testament, including, for example, the way Jesus condemns those who truckle to the strong while neglecting the poor.

And so I press Jeffress to explain the choices he makes, to explain the things he says in front of the cameras. He could be in favor of immigration reform, for example, and not feel compelled to rationalize the separation of families. He could believe that God has put someone in power and still hold that person to a high moral standard.

After each citation, he pauses to let his words linger. His reasoning is based on the fact that every word of the Bible is literally true. Jeffress agrees with the popular comparison evangelicals draw between President Trump and Cyrus the Great, the ancient Persian king who, according to Jewish tradition, allowed the exiled Hebrews to return to Jerusalem. Jeffress, unlike his peers, is the full-time shepherd of a flock. In the lustrous sanctuary of First Baptist—the church has multiple six-story garages and crowded escalators and feels a little like one of the theaters or music halls a few blocks away in the Arts District—Jeffress preaches two sermons nearly every Sunday.

He attends luncheons and prayer meetings and Bible studies. He visits people in the hospital and performs weddings and funerals. At special events, visitors are given not a Bible but a copy of one of his books. I wish more Christians had the heart for the Lord that he does. Jeffress studiously insists that his politics and his pastorate are separate. I recently attended services on and off for five months and never heard Jeffress mention politics explicitly in a sermon. I heard him talk about how heaven is a real place and what people do there: enjoy the relief of a job well done, share fellowship with loved ones, get to better know their Lord.

Affluent older white people dressed in stiff suits and flowery dresses with matching hats. Young couples, the men in jeans and tucked-in button-downs, the women in cotton dresses. A black family spanning four generations. At the other end of the building, in a separate sanctuary, hundreds more people—mostly younger—watch Jeffress on a live broadcast. About twenty minutes into his sermon about worry, Jeffress says something that makes me perk up a bit.

And I can tell you for sure, I never want to experience that again. He makes another emphatic gesture with his right hand, this time with his thumb out in a way that evokes Bill Clinton. As he always does, Jeffress invites anyone who wants to be saved to come forward and dedicate their life to Jesus Christ.

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